Kidneys Articles A-Z

Generic Myfortic - Neoral Dosage

This page contains links to eMedTV Kidneys Articles containing information on subjects from Generic Myfortic to Neoral Dosage. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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Descriptions of Articles
  • Generic Myfortic
    As this eMedTV article points out, Myfortic (mycophenolate sodium) is protected by a patent that prevents any generic versions from being made. This resource talks about when a generic version of this immunosuppressant could become available.
  • Generic Neoral
    As explained in this eMedTV Web selection, generic Neoral is available in several strengths and forms. This article takes a closer look at these generic products, including who makes them and whether they are as good as the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Nexavar
    There are no generic Nexavar (sorafenib) products available at this time. This selection from the eMedTV Web site explains when a generic might become available and describes the difference between a generic name and a generic version of a drug.
  • Generic NULOJIX
    Like other "biologic" medicines, NULOJIX (belatacept) is not allowed to be manufactured in generic form. This eMedTV article discusses the rules and laws that biologic drugs are under and explains the only way that generic NULOJIX products could be made.
  • Generic Omontys
    As this eMedTV article explains, it is not legal for companies to make a generic Omontys (peginesatide) product at this time, as patents prevent this from happening. However, after the patents expire, a generic version may become available.
  • Generic Orthoclone OKT3
    As explained in this eMedTV Web page, Orthoclone OKT3 (muromonab-CD3) is a type of "biologic" drug, and is not allowed to be made in generic form at this time. This article explains why generic versions are not available and when a generic might be made.
  • Generic Prograf
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, generic Prograf capsules are available in several strengths, but there are no generic versions of the injections available at this time. This page takes a closer look.
  • Generic Rapamune
    There is now a generic version of Rapamune (sirolimus) available. This page from the eMedTV Web site takes an in-depth look at this topic, with details on who makes it, the strength in which it is sold, and more.
  • Generic Simulect
    As with other "biologic" drugs, Simulect (basiliximab) is not allowed to be manufactured in generic form. This eMedTV page examines the regulations that prevent generic versions of biologic drugs and discusses when generic Simulect might be made.
  • Generic Torisel
    There are no generic Torisel (temsirolimus) products available at this time. This eMedTV article explores when a generic version might be manufactured and explains why temsirolimus is the "generic name" and not a generic version of the medication.
  • Generic Votrient
    There are no generic Votrient (pazopanib) products available at this time. This eMedTV page discusses why this is the case and explains when a generic version might be made. This resource also explains why pazopanib is not a generic version of Votrient.
  • How Does Myfortic Compare to CellCept?
    Myfortic and CellCept both contain mycophenolate, but are they interchangeable? This part of the eMedTV site explains how Myfortic compares to CellCept and includes links to more detailed information on both medications.
  • Inlita
    Inlyta is a drug licensed to slow down the progression of advanced renal cell carcinoma (kidney cancer). This eMedTV article offers a brief look at this prescription drug and provides a link to more details. Inlita is a common misspelling of Inlyta.
  • Inlyta
    Inlyta is a prescription drug used to slow down the progression of advanced kidney cancer. This eMedTV segment contains an in-depth look at this medication, with details on dosing instructions, how it works, potential side effects, and more.
  • Inlyta and Breastfeeding
    It is usually recommended that women not breastfeed and take Inlyta (axitinib) at the same time. This eMedTV article explores this topic, with details on the possible problems that might occur in a nursing infant whose mother is taking the drug.
  • Inlyta and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV page explains, men and women who are taking Inlyta (axitinib) are typically advised to use birth control to prevent pregnancy. This page explains why this is the case and lists some possible problems Inlyta might cause during pregnancy.
  • Inlyta Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, Inlyta comes as a tablet and is taken twice daily. This article contains detailed information on how your particular dosage of Inlyta will be determined and offers some helpful tips on properly taking this chemotherapy drug.
  • Inlyta Drug
    Inlyta can help to slow down the progression of advanced renal cell carcinoma (kidney cancer). This eMedTV resource gives a brief overview of this drug, including how Inlyta is taken and possible side effects. A link to more information is also provided.
  • Inlyta Drug Interactions
    Certain medications that affect the activity of liver enzymes may cause drug interactions with Inlyta. This eMedTV article examines specific medicines that may interfere with Inlyta, and describes the complications that may occur as a result.
  • Inlyta Medication Information
    A doctor may prescribe Inlyta to help slow down the progression of advanced kidney cancer in adults. This eMedTV article contains basic information on Inlyta, including dosing guidelines for the medication. A link to more details is also provided.
  • Inlyta Overdose
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, seek immediate medical care if you have taken too much Inlyta (axitinib), as an overdose can be fatal. This article provides a list of possible overdose effects and describes how these complications may be treated.
  • Inlyta Side Effects
    If you are taking Inlyta, you may develop diarrhea or other side effects. This eMedTV Web page contains a detailed list of side effects that can occur with this drug, including some dangerous problems that require immediate medical treatment.
  • Inlyta Uses
    Available by prescription, Inlyta is used for treating advanced renal cell carcinoma in adults. This eMedTV Web selection takes a look at this specific form of kidney cancer and explains how Inlyta can help slow down the progression of the disease.
  • Inlyta Warnings and Precautions
    As explained in this eMedTV page, Inlyta can increase your risk for complications such as potentially serious bleeding or high blood pressure. This page contains safety precautions for Inlyta, including warnings of dangerous problems that can occur.
  • Interaction Between CellCept and Acyclovir
    Is there a potential interaction between acyclovir and CellCept? This eMedTV resource explains what can happen when these drugs are taken together and offers information on what your doctor may recommend to help avoid any complications.
  • Intravenous CellCept
    As this eMedTV resource discusses, receiving CellCept through an intravenous (IV) infusion twice daily can help prevent transplant rejection. This article also covers general safety issues with this medicine and offers a link to more details.
  • Is It Okay to Cut CellCept?
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, it is not okay to cut CellCept, as the tablets and capsules must be swallowed whole. This article offers some more tips on how to safely take this medicine and provides a link to more dosing instructions.
  • Micophenolate
    As this eMedTV article explains, mycophenolate is an anti-rejection drug used in people who have had a heart, liver, or kidney transplant. This page gives a basic overview of this medication. Micophenolate is a common misspelling of mycophenolate.
  • Micophenylate
    Mycophenolate is a drug used to help keep the body from rejecting a transplanted organ. This eMedTV Web resource takes a closer look at the different forms of this drug. Micophenylate is a common misspelling of mycophenolate.
  • Mifortic
    If you have recently had a kidney transplant, your healthcare provider may prescribe Myfortic. This eMedTV Web selection gives a brief overview of this drug and provides a link to more information. Mifortic is a common misspelling of Myfortic.
  • Mycophenalate
    Available by prescription, mycophenolate is an anti-rejection drug used after certain organ transplants. This eMedTV segment gives a brief overview of this drug and how it works. Mycophenalate is a common misspelling of mycophenolate.
  • Mycophenlate
    As explained in this eMedTV page, mycophenolate prevents organ rejection in people who have had a liver, heart, or kidney transplant. This article gives a brief overview of this immunosuppressant. Mycophenlate is a common misspelling of mycophenolate.
  • Mycophenolate
    Mycophenolate helps prevent organ rejection following a heart, liver, or kidney transplant. This eMedTV segment gives a complete overview of this immunosuppressant, including the available forms and strengths, dosing guidelines, and side effects.
  • Mycophenolate 500
    As this eMedTV segment explains, 500 mg is the highest strength available for mycophenolate. This resource offers some basic information on the types of mycophenolate that are used after an organ transplant and includes a link to more details.
  • Mycophenolate Acid
    As explained in this selection from the eMedTV archives, mycophenolate acid is another name for mycophenolate sodium (Myfortic). This article looks at the different forms of mycophenolate and provides a link to more in-depth information on this product.
  • Mycophenolate and Breastfeeding
    Because mycophenolate has not been studied in nursing women, it is unclear if it passes through breast milk. This eMedTV page covers mycophenolate and breastfeeding, with information on why it is generally not recommended to take this drug while nursing.
  • Mycophenolate and Pregnancy
    As explained in this eMedTV article, mycophenolate may cause problems if taken during pregnancy. However, in some cases, the benefits may outweigh the risks. This resource takes a closer look at the safety of using this drug when pregnant.
  • Mycophenolate Dosage
    As explained in this eMedTV article, mycophenolate dosages vary, based on the form of the drug being used and other factors. This resource talks about the dosing guidelines for this immunosuppressant, including when and how to take it.
  • Mycophenolate Drug Information
    Mycophenolate is a drug used to keep the body from rejecting a transplanted organ. This eMedTV Web page provides important information on mycophenolate, including the different forms and safety precautions. A link to more details is also included.
  • Mycophenolate for Systemic Lupus
    Treating kidney inflammation caused by systemic lupus is one of the off-label uses of mycophenolate. This eMedTV Web segment gives a basic description of what this immunosuppressant is approved for and provides a link to more information on it.
  • Mycophenolate Overdose
    Seek prompt medical attention if you believe you have overdosed on mycophenolate. This eMedTV Web resource lists possible symptoms that may occur if too much of this drug is used and describes the various treatment options that are available.
  • Mycophenolate Side Effects
    If you are taking mycophenolate, side effects may occur and can include fever, nausea, and insomnia. This eMedTV page offers a detailed list of other reactions this medication might cause, including some of the serious problems that require medical care.
  • Mycophenolic Acid
    Some people refer to mycophenolate sodium (Myfortic) as mycophenolic acid or mycophenolate acid. This part of the eMedTV site explains what this medication is used for and how it works. A link to more information on this product is also provided.
  • Mycophenylate
    For most people, receiving an organ transplant means taking anti-rejection drugs, such as mycophenolate. This eMedTV Web selection gives a brief overview of how this prescription medication works. Mycophenylate is a common misspelling of mycophenolate.
  • Myfortic
    Myfortic is an immunosuppressant designed to prevent organ rejection after a kidney transplant. This eMedTV Web article offers more details on this prescription medicine, with information on side effects, dosing, safety precautions, and more.
  • Myfortic 1440 Mg
    A daily Myfortic dose of 1440 mg is often recommended for people who have had a kidney transplant. This eMedTV segment briefly describes the dosing guidelines for this anti-rejection drug and provides a link to more information on this topic.
  • Myfortic and Breastfeeding
    As this eMedTV article explains, the manufacturer of Myfortic (mycophenolate sodium) recommends that women avoid this drug while nursing. This page offers more details about breastfeeding and Myfortic, including results of animal studies on this topic.
  • Myfortic and Leukopenia
    As this eMedTV resource explains, leukopenia is a common side effect of Myfortic. This article lists some of the other potential side effects of this immunosuppressant drug and offers a link to more in-depth information on this topic.
  • Myfortic and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV page explains, Myfortic (mycophenolate sodium) should only be used during pregnancy when the benefits outweigh the risks. This article explores why Myfortic is classified as a Category D medicine and lists some of the risks it may pose.
  • Myfortic Dosage
    Available in the form of a delayed-release tablet, Myfortic is taken twice a day to prevent organ rejection. This eMedTV selection covers the dosing guidelines for Myfortic, including details on why it should be taken at the same times each day.
  • Myfortic Drug Interactions
    Taking Myfortic with sevelamer, leflunomide, or other medicines may cause negative reactions. This eMedTV selection gives a list of drugs that may cause interactions with Myfortic, and describes the potentially serious complications that may result.
  • Myfortic Medication Information
    Myfortic is a drug used to prevent organ rejection after a kidney transplant. This eMedTV Web article offers more information on Myfortic, including general dosing guidelines and what your doctor needs to know before you begin treatment.
  • Myfortic Overdose
    Seek prompt medical attention if you have taken too much Myfortic (mycophenolate sodium). This part of the eMedTV Web site describes some potential overdose symptoms and explains the treatment options that may be used in people who have taken too much.
  • Myfortic Side Effects
    Some common side effects of Myfortic include nausea, constipation, and back pain. This eMedTV page lists other possible reactions to this immunosuppressant, including long-term effects and potentially serious problems that require medical care.
  • Myfortic Uses
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, the main use of Myfortic is to prevent organ rejection after a kidney transplant. This article discusses this use in detail and also outlines some off-label uses, such as the treatment of lupus nephritis.
  • Myfortic Warnings and Precautions
    You may not be able to safely use Myfortic if you have certain allergies or are taking certain drugs. This eMedTV resource covers important safety warnings and precautions with Myfortic, including what to tell your doctor before using this medication.
  • Names for Mycophenolate
    As this eMedTV page explains, mycophenolate is the active ingredient in two brand-name products. This article gives the names of these drugs and gives a brief explanation of what mycophenolate is used for.
  • Neoral
    Neoral is a medicine prescribed for the treatment of psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis. This eMedTV resource gives a detailed overview of this altered form of cyclosporine, including other approved uses, dosing tips, and possible side effects.
  • Neoral and Breastfeeding
    Neoral does pass through human breast milk and could cause problems in a nursing infant. This eMedTV Web page describes some of the problems that may occur if Neoral is taken while breastfeeding, and discusses the manufacturer's recommendations.
  • Neoral and Nursing
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, the manufacturer of Neoral recommends that women not take this drug while nursing. Neoral has not been extensively studied and may potentially cause problems in an infant whose mother is taking this drug.
  • Neoral and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV page explains, Neoral may cause problems if it is taken during pregnancy. This article describes what happened when this drug was given to pregnant animals and discusses when a doctor will prescribe it during pregnancy.
  • Neoral and Psoriatic Arthritis
    People who have psoriatic arthritis may benefit from Neoral. However, as this eMedTV page explains, this is not an approved use for the drug. This page describes how Neoral can help relieve symptoms and slow down the progression of psoriatic arthritis.
  • Neoral Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, dosing guidelines for Neoral will vary, depending on your weight, the reason for taking the drug, and various other factors. This article describes other factors that may affect your dose and offers tips on taking this drug.
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