Kidneys Articles A-Z

Polycystic Kidney Disease Types - Who Manufactures Neoral Cyclosporine?

This page contains links to eMedTV Kidneys Articles containing information on subjects from Polycystic Kidney Disease Types to Who Manufactures Neoral Cyclosporine?. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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Descriptions of Articles
  • Polycystic Kidney Disease Types
    This page on the eMedTV Web site explores the three types of polycystic kidney disease -- autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and acquired cystic kidney disease -- and provides information on their causes, symptoms, and how often they occur.
  • Polycystic Kidneys
    This eMedTV Web page talks about polycystic kidney disease, a condition that causes fluid-filled sacs to form in the kidneys. Topics covered in this article include common symptoms and treatment options.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Azasan
    This eMedTV page explains that if you have taken certain chemotherapy drugs, you may not be able to take Azasan. Other important precautions are covered in this article, including warnings for people who have a history of certain medical problems.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Everolimus
    As this eMedTV page explains, people who have ever had hepatitis B should consult their doctor before taking everolimus. This article offers more warnings and precautions for everolimus, including details on potentially dangerous side effects.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Mycophenolate
    Mycophenolate can increase your risk of certain types of cancer and can interfere with your immune system. This eMedTV selection lists many other important warnings and precautions for mycophenolate, including a list of those who should not take the drug.
  • Prograf
    Prograf is prescribed for the prevention of organ rejection after a heart, kidney, or liver transplant. This eMedTV Web page presents a detailed overview of this immunosuppressant medicine, including how it works, dosing tips, and possible side effects.
  • Prograf and Breastfeeding
    Infants may experience problems if their mother is taking Prograf while breastfeeding. This eMedTV segment describes some of the possible problems to watch out for in your child, and explains what the manufacturer of the medication recommends.
  • Prograf and Nephrotic Syndrome
    As this eMedTV resource explains, Prograf can be used off-label to treat nephrotic syndrome, a group of symptoms that occurs due to kidney damage. This page takes a closer look at how adults and children with nephrotic syndrome may benefit from Prograf.
  • Prograf and Neurotoxicity
    You may develop neurotoxicity while taking Prograf, which may cause serious problems like seizures and coma. This eMedTV page offers a brief description of other problems with the nervous system that may occur. A link to more details is also included.
  • Prograf and Pregnancy
    Heart, bone, and gallbladder problems occurred when high doses of Prograf were given to pregnant animals. This eMedTV page explores the results of animal studies done on this drug and explains why it may not be safe to take Prograf during pregnancy.
  • Prograf and Rheumatoid Arthritis
    A doctor may prescribe Prograf to treat rheumatoid arthritis; however, this is an unapproved use. This eMedTV segment explains whether it is safe to use this drug for rheumatoid arthritis treatment and provides a link to more detailed information.
  • Prograf Blood Problems
    People who are taking Prograf may develop blood problems, such as anemia or low platelets. This eMedTV Web selection gives more information about how your doctor will monitor you for these problems. A link to more details is also provided.
  • Prograf Dosage
    As explained in this eMedTV Web selection, dosing guidelines for Prograf will vary, based on your weight, age, and various other factors. This article describes other factors that may affect your dose and offers tips on taking this medication.
  • Prograf Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV article examines some of the many different drug interactions that may occur with Prograf, including those that may lead to dangerous complications. Some of the products described in this article are echinacea, grapefruit, and topotecan.
  • Prograf for Immunosuppression
    This eMedTV page explains that using Prograf for immunosuppression can help prevent organ rejection after a heart, kidney, or liver transplant. It also explains how this drug works and lists some off-label uses. A link to more details is also included.
  • Prograf Generic Name
    There are generic Prograf capsules available sold under the name Tacrolimus capsules. This eMedTV page offers more information on this generic medicine, including whether it is as good as the brand-name drug, and provides a link to more details.
  • Prograf Immunosuppressant
    This eMedTV Web selection offers a brief look at Prograf, a type of immunosuppressant used to prevent organ rejection after a kidney, liver, or heart transplant. This page explains how this medicine works and offers a link to more details on Prograf.
  • Prograf in Pediatric Patients
    As this eMedTV page explains, Prograf is approved for use in pediatric patients who have had a liver transplant. This page explains why this drug is not approved for use in children who have other types of transplants, and offers a link to more details.
  • Prograf Levels
    This page of the eMedTV Web archives discusses how your doctor may adjust your Prograf dose based on the levels of the drug in your blood. This resource covers some general dosing guidelines and offers a link to more detailed dosing instructions.
  • Prograf Liver Transplant Medicine
    If you have had a liver transplant, your doctor may have you take a medicine called Prograf. This eMedTV segment presents a brief overview of how this drug works to prevent organ transplant rejection and offers a link to more details.
  • Prograf Medication Information
    Prograf is a drug licensed to help prevent organ rejection after a heart, kidney, or liver transplant. This eMedTV page offers more information on Prograf, including how this prescription medication works, possible side effects, and safety warnings.
  • Prograf Overdose
    This eMedTV Web selection explains that if you use too much Prograf, it can cause problems like tremors or swelling. This article describes other possible overdose symptoms that may occur and discusses how your doctor may treat these reactions.
  • Prograf Side Affects
    Although most people do not have problems with Prograf, side effects are possible. This eMedTV article lists some of these reactions, including potentially serious problems. Prograf side affects is a common misspelling of Prograf side effects.
  • Prograf Side Effects
    When Prograf was studied in clinical trials, commonly reported side effects included headaches and diarrhea. This eMedTV page takes an in-depth look at other possible Prograf side effects, including potentially serious problems that require medical care.
  • Prograf Uses
    Prograf can help prevent organ rejection following a heart, kidney, or liver transplant. This eMedTV resource examines the approved uses for Prograf, with detailed information on how the drug works and whether it is safe for use in children.
  • Prograf Warnings and Precautions
    Prograf may not be the best choice for some people, including those with a history of diabetes or anemia. This eMedTV Web page describes some important precautions and safety warnings for Prograf, including potentially serious problems that may occur.
  • Prograff
    As this eMedTV page explains, people who have had a heart, liver, or kidney transplant may benefit from Prograf. This page describes side effects and general safety precautions to be aware of with this drug. Prograff is a common misspelling of Prograf.
  • Prograph
    Prograf can help prevent organ rejection in people who have had a liver, heart, or kidney transplant. This eMedTV segment takes a look at this prescription drug, including how it works and side effects. Prograph is a common misspelling of Prograf.
  • Progref
    Prograf is a drug licensed to prevent organ rejection after a transplant. This eMedTV Web selection offers a brief overview of this prescription drug and provides a link to more details. Progref is a common misspelling of Prograf.
  • Rapamune
    People who have had a kidney transplant may be prescribed Rapamune. This part of the eMedTV site gives a complete overview of this medication, with details on available strengths, potential side effects, dosing guidelines, and more.
  • Rapamune and Breastfeeding
    Does Rapamune (sirolimus) pass through breast milk? This eMedTV selection gives an overview of breastfeeding and Rapamune, including the manufacturer's recommendation on whether you should nurse while taking this drug.
  • Rapamune and Pregnancy
    The full risks of using Rapamune (sirolimus) during pregnancy are unclear. This eMedTV page is an important resource for women who are considering taking this drug during pregnancy. Information on the results of animal studies is also included.
  • Rapamune Dosage
    Rapamune should be taken at the same time each day. This selection from the eMedTV Web site further explores the dosing guidelines for Rapamune and lists the factors that will affect how much your healthcare provider prescribes.
  • Rapamune Drug Interactions
    As this eMedTV page explains, drug interactions can occur when Rapamune is taken with medications such as Decadron, Rifadin, or Nolvadex. This article also describes the steps your doctor may take to avoid your risk for complications.
  • Rapamune Medication Information
    Rapamune is an anti-rejection drug taken after a kidney transplant. This portion of the eMedTV Web site offers more information on Rapamune, explaining the medication's dosing guidelines, possible side effects, general safety precautions, and more.
  • Rapamune Monitoring
    When you are taking Rapamune, your doctor will give you blood tests to make sure you are at the right dose. This eMedTV segment offers more information on the monitoring that will be done while taking this drug.
  • Rapamune Overdose
    It is unclear what may happen if someone overdoses on Rapamune (sirolimus). However, as this eMedTV article explains, overdose effects are expected to be similar to the drug's usual side effects, such as swelling. Treatment options are also discussed.
  • Rapamune Side Effects
    While taking Rapamune, some people develop side effects like high blood pressure or swelling of the hands. This eMedTV Web page takes you through a more detailed list of potential side effects, with instructions on what to do if serious reactions occur.
  • Rapamune Solution
    As explained in this eMedTV article, you can buy Rapamune as an oral solution (liquid) or a tablet. This article offers some quick dosing tips for using the oral solution and provides a link to more in-depth instructions.
  • Rapamune Uses
    The primary reason for using Rapamune is to prevent organ rejection after a kidney transplant. This eMedTV selection takes an in-depth look at what the drug is used for, including a description of who can take it and how it is sometimes used "off-label."
  • Rapamune Warnings and Precautions
    If you are taking Rapamune, talk to your healthcare provider before getting any kind of vaccine. This eMedTV article looks at other important warnings and precautions for Rapamune, including details on who should avoid this immunosuppressant altogether.
  • Rappamune
    Rapamune helps reduce the risk of organ rejection after a kidney transplant. This eMedTV selection tells you what you need to know about this prescription drug and provides a link to more information. Rappamune is a common misspelling of Rapamune.
  • Sellcept
    A healthcare provider may prescribe CellCept to prevent the rejection of an organ transplant. This eMedTV Web article describes how CellCept works and lists some of its potential side effects. Sellcept is a common misspelling of CellCept.
  • Side Effects of Nexavar
    Common side effects of Nexavar may include fatigue, diarrhea, and a rash. This eMedTV segment outlines other possible problems reported with the drug, including potentially serious side effects that require immediate medical care.
  • Simulect
    Simulect is a prescription drug used to prevent organ rejection after a kidney transplant. This eMedTV resource takes an in-depth look at this medicine, with details on dosing instructions, how it works, side effects, and more.
  • Simulect and Breastfeeding
    The manufacturer of Simulect (basiliximab) recommends that women avoid this drug while nursing. This eMedTV Web selection talks about breastfeeding and Simulect, with information on why it is thought that this drug would pass through breast milk.
  • Simulect and Pregnancy
    Although it is generally considered safe to use Simulect (basiliximab) during pregnancy, this eMedTV article explains why the manufacturer of the medication recommends that women use an effective form of birth control during Simulect treatment.
  • Simulect Dosage
    As this eMedTV page discusses, Simulect is a medicine that is administered intravenously to help prevent organ rejection after a kidney transplant. This article describes specific dosing guidelines for Simulect and explains how your dose is determined.
  • Simulect Drug Interactions
    Echinacea, sipuleucel-T, and certain other drugs are known to interact with Simulect. This eMedTV Web page examines other medicines that may interfere with Simulect, and describes the problems that may occur as a result.
  • Simulect Medication Information
    A doctor may prescribe Simulect to help prevent organ rejection following a kidney transplant. This eMedTV page contains some basic information on Simulect, including how this medication works and how it is given. A link to more details is also provided.
  • Simulect Overdose
    A healthcare provider will administer Simulect (basiliximab), so an overdose is unlikely. This eMedTV resource explores why it's unclear what symptoms to expect and explains what to do if you believe you have received too much of this anti-rejection drug.
  • Simulect Side Effects
    If you are receiving Simulect, side effects may occur and can include diarrhea, vomiting, and heartburn. This eMedTV segment contains a detailed list of other reactions this drug might cause, including some dangerous problems that require medical care.
  • Simulect Uses
    Available by prescription, Simulect is used for preventing organ rejection following a kidney transplant. This eMedTV article examines how this anti-rejection medicine works, who it is approved for, and possible unapproved uses for the drug.
  • Simulect Warnings and Precautions
    Simulect can increase your risk for certain problems, such as diabetes and a certain type of cancer. This eMedTV article lists more warnings and precautions for Simulect, including details on why this medicine may not be the best option for some people.
  • Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Nexavar
    People who have squamous cell carcinoma may not be able to safely take Nexavar. This eMedTV resource explains how taking Nexavar with certain drugs used to treat this type of lung cancer could lead to death. A link to more details is also included.
  • Strength of Myfortic
    As explained in this selection from the eMedTV site, two different strengths of Myfortic are available. This article lists these strengths and briefly describes what this drug is used for. A link for people who want to learn more is also provided.
  • Too Much Prograf
    Taking too much Prograf may result in kidney problems, tremors, or other problems. This eMedTV Web selection examines what may happen if someone overdoses on this drug, with details on possible treatment options and a link to more information.
  • Toricel
    Torisel is a medicine used for the treatment of advanced kidney cancer. This eMedTV Web selection explains how this drug works, covers some dosing information, and lists possible side effects. Toricel is a common misspelling of Torisel.
  • Torisel
    Available by prescription, Torisel is a drug used to slow down the progression of advanced kidney cancer. This eMedTV resource takes a closer look at this medicine, including how it works, general dosing guidelines, safety precautions, and more.
  • Torisel and Breastfeeding
    It is unknown if Torisel (temsirolimus) passes through human breast milk. This page of the eMedTV site discusses whether it is safe for women who are breastfeeding to use Torisel and explains what the manufacturer of the medicine recommends.
  • Torisel and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV resource discusses, women who are pregnant should only receive Torisel (temsirolimus) when the benefits outweigh the risks. This article further examines why Torisel is categorized as a Category D drug and lists the problems it may cause.
  • Torisel Dosage
    As explained in this eMedTV article, dosing guidelines for Torisel will vary for each person, depending on other medicines they are taking and their liver function. This page also lists some important tips on what to expect when receiving this infusion.
  • Torisel Drug Interactions
    It may not be safe to combine Torisel with products like echinacea, live vaccines, or cyclosporine. This eMedTV article offers a detailed list of drugs that may cause interactions with Torisel and describes the potentially serious problems that may occur.
  • Torisel Medication Information
    If you have advanced kidney cancer, you may benefit from Torisel. This selection from the eMedTV Web site provides more information on Torisel, including how the medication works and possible safety concerns.
  • Torisel Overdose
    Confusion, seizures, and difficulty breathing could occur if you receive too much Torisel (temsirolimus). This eMedTV Web selection describes other possible overdose symptoms and explains why an overdose on this drug is unlikely to occur.
  • Torisel Side Effects
    Diarrhea, coughing, and weakness are among the most commonly reported Torisel side effects. This eMedTV segment provides a detailed list of other reactions this medication might cause, including some of the serious problems that may require medical care.
  • Torisel Uses
    Torisel is prescribed to slow down the growth of advanced kidney cancer in adults. This eMedTV page examines what Torisel is used for, including unapproved reasons a doctor may prescribe this drug. A description of how this drug works is also provided.
  • Torisel Warnings and Precautions
    If you have moderate-to-severe liver impairment, you should not receive Torisel. This eMedTV segment describes some of the safety warnings and precautions you should be aware of with Torisel, including potentially life-threatening problems that may occur.
  • Transplant Medications and Simulect
    If you have had a kidney transplant, your doctor may give you a medicine called Simulect. This eMedTV segment presents an overview of Simulect, including how this medication works to prevent organ transplant rejection, and links to more details.
  • Votriant
    Votrient is a drug used for the treatment of certain types of cancer in adults. This eMedTV resource explains how this medicine works, covers some dosing information, and lists possible side effects. Votriant is a common misspelling of Votrient.
  • Votrien
    If you have advanced kidney cancer or soft tissue sarcoma, your doctor may prescribe Votrient. This eMedTV article describes how Votrient works and lists some of its potential side effects. Votrien is a common misspelling of Votrient.
  • Votrient
    Votrient is a drug licensed to slow down the progression of certain types of cancer. This eMedTV Web page provides a complete overview of this product, with details on how it works, potential side effects, general dosing guidelines, and more.
  • Votrient and Breastfeeding
    It is typically not recommended for women to take Votrient (pazopanib) while breastfeeding. This eMedTV resource explains whether the drug passes through human breast milk and describes what to watch for if you take this medication while nursing.
  • Votrient and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV Web page explains why it may not be safe for a woman to take Votrient (pazopanib) during pregnancy. This page describes what happened when this drug was given to pregnant animals and explains when a doctor will prescribe it during pregnancy.
  • Votrient Dosage
    The usual dose of Votrient for treating kidney cancer is 800 mg once daily. This selection from the eMedTV Web library describes the factors that may affect your dosage, outlines specific dosing guidelines, and offers helpful tips on taking this drug.
  • Votrient Drug Interactions
    Many drugs can cause negative interactions with Votrient, including Lipitor, Prolia, and Arava. This eMedTV article examines these and other products that can react with Votrient, with detailed information on the problems these interactions can cause.
  • Votrient Medication Information
    Votrient is a drug approved to treat advanced kidney cancer in adults. This portion of the eMedTV Web site provides more information on Votrient, including how this prescription cancer medication works, possible side effects, and safety issues.
  • Votrient Overdose
    As explained in this eMedTV article, if you take too much Votrient (pazopanib), it can cause problems like high blood pressure and excessive fatigue. This page describes factors that may affect overdose symptoms and lists possible treatment options.
  • Votrient Side Effects
    Headaches, diarrhea, and vomiting are some of the most commonly reported Votrient side effects. This eMedTV segment describes other possible reactions to this drug, including potentially serious complications that require medical treatment.
  • Votrient Uses
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, Votrient is prescribed to treat soft tissue sarcoma and advanced kidney cancer. This article offers more information on what Votrient is used for, including nonapproved uses and whether it can be given to children.
  • Votrient Warnings and Precautions
    You may have an increased risk for developing heart attacks and strokes while taking Votrient. This eMedTV Web page features more warnings and precautions for Votrient, including details on who should not take this drug and the problems that may occur.
  • Votriente
    Votrient is licensed to treat advanced renal cell carcinoma (kidney cancer) and soft tissue sarcoma. This eMedTV Web page presents a brief overview of this drug and provides a link to more information. Votriente is a common misspelling of Votrient.
  • What Is Azasan Used For?
    As this eMedTV article explains, Azasan is used for preventing organ rejection following a kidney transplant and for relieving symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. This page takes a detailed look at how this drug works, who it is approved for, and more.
  • What Is CellCept?
    CellCept is prescribed to prevent organ rejection after a heart, kidney, or liver transplant. This eMedTV Web page further discusses what CellCept is used for, how it works, and dosing guidelines. A link to more details is also provided.
  • What Is Everolimus Used For?
    Everolimus is prescribed to treat certain types of cancers and tumors, and can prevent organ rejection. This eMedTV page explains how this drug works and explores other uses for everolimus, including unapproved reasons a doctor may prescribe this drug.
  • What Is Mycophenolate Used For?
    As explained in this part of the eMedTV Web site, mycophenolate is used to prevent organ rejection after a kidney, heart, or liver transplant. This article discusses in detail how the drug works and also lists some off-label uses.
  • What Is Neoral Used to Treat?
    People with rheumatoid arthritis or plaque psoriasis may benefit from Neoral. This eMedTV Web selection takes a look at what Neoral is used to treat, including possible off-label (unapproved) uses for the drug. A link to more details is also included.
  • What Is Rapamune Used For?
    Are you curious about what Rapamune is used for? This selection from the eMedTV Web library describes this immunosuppressant and its primary use, and also includes a link to a full-length article with more detailed information.
  • What Is the Mechanism of Action for Prograf?
    By suppressing the immune system, Prograf can help prevent organ transplant rejection. This eMedTV segment further explores Prograf's mechanism of action and provides a link to more detailed information on this prescription drug.
  • Who Manufactures Neoral Cyclosporine?
    Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation manufactures Neoral, an altered form of cyclosporine. This eMedTV resource further explores this topic, with a list of who manufactures the generic versions of this drug. A link to more details is also included.
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