Kidneys Articles A-Z

Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease - Generic Mycophenolate

This page contains links to eMedTV Kidneys Articles containing information on subjects from Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease to Generic Mycophenolate. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease
    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is a condition that causes cysts to grow in the kidneys. This eMedTV page explains the gene mutation that causes this disease, and also discusses symptoms and treatment options.
  • Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease
    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease is a rare and often fatal condition. This page from the eMedTV library describes this condition with detail, including information on symptoms, treatment options, diagnosis, and more.
  • Azasan
    Azasan is prescribed to prevent organ rejection after a kidney transplant and to treat rheumatoid arthritis. This eMedTV Web page presents an overview of this medication, with details on dosing instructions, how it works, possible side effects, and more.
  • Azasan and Breastfeeding
    As explained in this eMedTV selection, the manufacturer of Azasan warns against using this drug while breastfeeding. However, many healthcare providers believe that it is safe to do so. This article discusses this topic in more detail.
  • Azasan and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV page explains, Azasan may cause fetal harm if given to a pregnant woman. This article addresses the drug's safety during pregnancy, and examines the complications that occurred when it was used by pregnant women and animals.
  • Azasan Dosage
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, your doctor will determine your Azasan dose based on your weight, the reasons you are taking it, and various other factors. This page covers dosing guidelines for this drug, including tips on when and how to take it.
  • Azasan Drug Information
    People who have received a kidney transplant or who have rheumatoid arthritis may be given Azasan. This eMedTV segment offers some information on Azasan, including how to take it and possible side effects of the drug. It also links to more details.
  • Azasan Overdose
    Taking an overdose of Azasan may result in vomiting, bleeding, and other problems. This eMedTV resource focuses on other possible complications that may occur when too much of this drug is taken, and also describes how these problems may be treated.
  • Azasan Side Effects
    If you are taking Azasan, side effects may occur and can include infections, nausea, and vomiting. This eMedTV resource examines other reactions this drug might cause, including some dangerous problems that require immediate medical treatment.
  • Benefits of Rapamune
    This eMedTV Web page talks about the main benefit of Rapamune: a decreased risk of organ rejection after a kidney transplant. A brief explanation of how this medicine works is provided, as is a link to more detailed information on it.
  • Can You Take Prograf With Food?
    This page from the eMedTV Web site discusses whether you can take your Prograf dose with food. This article also explains why it is important to take your dose at the same time every day. A link to more dosing tips and guidelines is also provided.
  • Celcep
    Available by prescription, CellCept prevents organ rejection after a heart, liver, or kidney transplant. This eMedTV Web page presents a brief overview of this drug and provides a link to more information. Celcep is a common misspelling of CellCept.
  • Celcept
    CellCept is a prescription medicine licensed to prevent organ rejection after a transplant. This eMedTV Web page provides a brief overview of this prescription drug and offers a link to more details. Celcept is a common misspelling of CellCept.
  • Cellcepp
    You may benefit from CellCept if you have a heart, liver, or kidney transplant. This eMedTV segment explains what your doctor needs to know before you can take this medicine and links to more details. Cellcepp is a common misspelling of CellCept.
  • CellCept
    CellCept is prescribed for the prevention of organ rejection after a liver, heart, or kidney transplant. This eMedTV segment features a detailed overview of this medicine, including how it works, available forms, dosing tips, and possible side effects.
  • CellCept 500 Mg
    This eMedTV page explains that your age and current medications are among the factors your doctor will consider when deciding to prescribe 200 mg, 250 mg, or 500 mg of CellCept. This page lists the different forms of the medication.
  • CellCept and Breastfeeding
    It is generally not recommended for women to take CellCept (mycophenolate mofetil) while breastfeeding. This eMedTV article discusses whether the drug passes through human breast milk and describes some of the possible problems that may occur.
  • CellCept and Cancer
    There is an increased risk of developing cancer while using CellCept. This page of the eMedTV site examines this potentially serious complication, including why people taking this drug may have an increased risk for lymphoma or skin cancer.
  • CellCept and Lupus
    Using CellCept to treat lupus nephritis is one off-label (unapproved) use for the drug. This eMedTV Web selection discusses the approved uses of this drug and offers a link to more details on other unapproved uses.
  • CellCept and Nausea
    If you are taking CellCept, you may develop nausea. This selection from the eMedTV Web site takes a brief look at other possible side effects of this drug, including details on when to contact your doctor. A link to more information is also included.
  • CellCept and Pregnancy
    As explained in this eMedTV Web page, miscarriages and abnormal fetal development may occur if CellCept (mycophenolate mofetil) is taken during pregnancy. This page further explores why it may not be safe for women to take this drug during pregnancy.
  • CellCept and Shingles
    You may develop complications such as brain infections or shingles while taking CellCept. This eMedTV page offers a brief description of how this medication can increase your risk for various infections. A link to more details is also included.
  • CellCept Dosage
    As discussed in this eMedTV Web page, dosing guidelines for CellCept will vary, based on your weight, age, and various other factors. This article describes other factors that may affect your dose and offers tips on taking this medicine.
  • CellCept Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV page outlines some of the many different drug interactions that may occur with CellCept, including those that may lead to serious complications. Some of the products described in this article are antibiotics, oral contraceptives, and antacids.
  • CellCept Generic Name
    As explained in this eMedTV page, there are generic CellCept tablets and capsules available, sold under the name Mycophenolate Mofetil tablets and capsules. This page offers more details, including whether the generics are as good as the brand-name drug.
  • CellCept Interactions
    If you are taking CellCept, interactions may occur if this medicine is combined with certain other products. This eMedTV article takes a closer look at some of the products that may interfere with CellCept, and provides a link to more information.
  • CellCept Mechanism of Action
    By making the immune system less active, CellCept can help prevent organ transplant rejection. This eMedTV resource further explores CellCept's mechanism of action and provides a link to more detailed information on this prescription medication.
  • CellCept Medication Information
    CellCept is a drug approved to prevent organ rejection after a liver, kidney, or heart transplant. This eMedTV article provides more information on CellCept, including how this prescription medication works, possible side effects, and safety issues.
  • CellCept Mycophenolate
    As explained in this part of the eMedTV library, mycophenolate is the active ingredient in CellCept, a drug used to prevent organ rejection in people who have had a kidney, heart, or liver transplant. This page also links to more detailed information.
  • CellCept Overdose
    This eMedTV resource explains that if you take too much CellCept, it can cause problems like vomiting and diarrhea. This page describes other possible overdose symptoms that may occur and discusses how your doctor may treat these reactions.
  • CellCept Side Effects
    People who took CellCept in clinical trials commonly reported side effects such as diarrhea and headaches. This eMedTV page takes a detailed look at other possible side effects, including some dangerous problems that require medical attention.
  • CellCept Tablet
    A doctor may prescribe CellCept tablets to prevent a transplant rejection. This eMedTV page describes how this medicine works, covers dosing guidelines, and lists possible side effects. A link to more details on other forms of this drug is also included.
  • CellCept Uses
    If you have had a kidney, heart, or liver transplant, using CellCept can prevent organ rejection. This eMedTV Web selection examines what this medicine is used for, with detailed information on how it works and whether it is safe for use in children.
  • CellCept Warnings and Precautions
    CellCept may not be appropriate for some people, including those with a history of diabetes or cancer. This eMedTV article describes several warnings and safety precautions for CellCept, with details on potentially serious complications that may occur.
  • Cellsept
    CellCept is a drug used for the prevention of organ rejection after a heart, liver, or kidney transplant. This eMedTV page also explains how this prescription medicine works and links to more details. Cellsept is a common misspelling of CellCept.
  • Celsept
    CellCept is a medicine used to prevent organ rejection after a heart, liver, or kidney transplant. This eMedTV resource gives a brief overview of this drug, including possible side effects. Celsept is a common misspelling of CellCept.
  • Drug Interactions With Azasan
    Combining Azasan with certain products can cause leukopenia, blood clots, or other complications. This eMedTV Web selection further explores some of these Azasan drug interactions, and describes the potentially serious problems that may occur.
  • Drug Interactions With Everolimus
    If you combine everolimus with cyclosporine, echinacea, or other products, it may cause negative reactions. This eMedTV segment outlines other drugs that may cause interactions with everolimus, and describes the serious complications that may result.
  • Drug Interactions With Mycophenolate
    Tacrolimus, proton pump inhibitors, and other products can cause drug interactions with mycophenolate. This eMedTV page lists other important reactions you should be aware of before beginning treatment and explains how to reduce your risk for problems.
  • Enlitea
    Inlyta is prescribed to slow down the progression of advanced kidney cancer. This eMedTV resource takes a look at this prescription drug, including specific uses, side effects, and dosing instructions. Enlitea is a common misspelling of Inlyta.
  • Epigen
    Epogen is a prescription medication that is used for treating anemia due to various causes. This eMedTV resource further explores Epogen uses and lists possible side effects of the drug. Epigen is a common misspelling of Epogen.
  • Epogen
    Epogen is a prescription drug used to treat anemia due to chemotherapy, renal failure, or zidovudine. This eMedTV Web page discusses in detail other Epogen uses, explains how the medication works, and offers general dosing information.
  • Epogen and Breastfeeding
    At this time, it is not known if Epogen is safe for pregnant women. This eMedTV Web page discusses Epogen and breastfeeding in more detail, including information on why the drug isn't likely to cause problems even if it does pass through breast milk.
  • Epogen and Diarrhea
    Diarrhea is a side effect that may occur with the use of Epogen. This article from the eMedTV Web site further explores the link between Epogen and diarrhea, and explains when you should report diarrhea to your healthcare provider.
  • Epogen and Pregnancy
    At this time, the risks of using Epogen during pregnancy are not fully understood. This page of the eMedTV library offers more information on Epogen and pregnancy, and explains what problems were seen when the drug was given to pregnant animals.
  • Epogen Dosage
    Epogen dosing is usually determined by weight. As this eMedTV page explains, the suggested dose for treating anemia due to kidney failure is 50 to 100 units per kg three times a week. Other Epogen dosage guidelines are also listed in this article.
  • Epogen Drug Information
    Are you looking for information on the drug Epogen? This eMedTV article is a great place to start. It provides a basic overview of this medicine, explaining why it is prescribed, how it is given, and what to discuss with your doctor prior to taking it.
  • Epogen Drug Interactions
    At this time, no studies have been conducted to check for Epogen drug interactions. As this eMedTV article explains, although there are currently no known drug interactions, it does not mean that Epogen will not interact with other medicines.
  • Epogen Overdose
    Strokes, blood clots, or heart attacks could occur as a result of an Epogen overdose. This section of the eMedTV Web site lists other complications that may develop from taking too much Epogen. Overdose treatment options are also listed on this page.
  • Epogen Side Effects
    Infections, fever, and constipation are some of the most commonly reported Epogen side effects. This eMedTV resource explains what other side effects may occur with Epogen and lists potentially serious problems that should be reported to a doctor.
  • Epogen Uses
    Epogen is used for treating anemia due to chemotherapy, chronic kidney failure, or zidovudine (an HIV drug). This eMedTV article further explains what the medication is used for, including possible "off-label" Epogen uses.
  • Epogen Warnings and Precautions
    Epogen can accelerate the worsening of cancer and may shorten survival. This eMedTV article contains more Epogen warnings and precautions, including information on who should not take the drug and a list of possible side effects that may occur.
  • Epogin
    Epogen is a drug that is commonly prescribed to treat anemia due to chemotherapy or renal failure. This eMedTV page further explains what this medicine is used for and links to more detailed information. Epogin is a common misspelling of Epogen.
  • Everlimus
    As explained in this eMedTV article, everolimus is prescribed to treat certain cancers, as well as to prevent kidney transplant rejection. This page offers dosing tips and possible side effects. Everlimus is a common misspelling of everolimus.
  • Everolimus
    Everolimus is a drug prescribed to prevent organ rejection and to treat certain cancers and tumors. This eMedTV resource takes a closer look at this medication, with details on dosing guidelines, how it works, potential side effects, and more.
  • Everolimus and Breastfeeding
    The manufacturer of everolimus recommends that women avoid this drug while nursing. This eMedTV Web page takes a closer look at the potential risks of taking everolimus while breastfeeding, including the results of animal studies on this topic.
  • Everolimus and Delayed Wound Healing
    If you are taking everolimus, you may notice delayed wound healing. This page from the eMedTV Web library briefly discusses how it may take longer for wounds to heal while taking this medicine and offers a link to more detailed information.
  • Everolimus and Pregnancy
    When given to pregnant animals, everolimus increased the risk of miscarriages and fetal harm. This eMedTV Web page explains why this medicine may not be safe for women who are pregnant, and why the drug is both a pregnancy Category C and D medicine.
  • Everolimus Dosage
    As explained in this eMedTV page, everolimus is taken once or twice daily to prevent an organ rejection or to treat certain cancers and tumors. This article lists specific dosing guidelines for everolimus and explains how to take it.
  • Everolimus Drug Information
    If you have cancer or have had a kidney transplant, you may benefit from everolimus. This eMedTV page offers more information on everolimus, including how the drug works and possible safety concerns. A link to more details is also included.
  • Everolimus Overdose
    As this eMedTV segment explains, the effects of an everolimus overdose will depend on how much of the drug was taken and various other factors. This article describes what happened when a child overdosed on this drug and lists possible treatment options.
  • Everolimus Side Effects
    People taking everolimus may experience side effects such as diarrhea, fatigue, and nausea. This eMedTV Web selection offers a detailed list of other reactions that might occur with this drug, including serious problems that require medical care.
  • Generic CellCept
    As this eMedTV page explains, generic CellCept (mycophenolate mofetil) capsules and tablets are available, but there are no generics for the injections or the liquid available at this time. This page also explains when these generics might be available.
  • Generic Epogen
    Epogen, like other "biologic" medications, is not allowed to be manufactured in generic form. This eMedTV segment describes the rules and laws that biologic medications are under and explains the only way that generic Epogen products could be made.
  • Generic Inlyta
    At this time, there are no generic Inlyta (axitinib) products available. This article from the eMedTV Web library explains why companies have not made a generic version of this drug and discusses whether a generic might become available in the future.
  • Generic Mycophenolate
    Some forms of mycophenolate can be purchased in generic form. This page from the eMedTV site takes a closer look at generic mycophenolate, with details on when more generic versions are expected and why CellCept and Myfortic are not interchangeable.
Terms of Use
Advertise with Us
Contact Us
About eMedTV
Privacy Policy
Copyright © 2006-2017 Clinaero, Inc.
eMedTV serves only as an informational resource. This site does not dispense medical advice or advice of any kind. Site users seeking medical advice about their specific situation should consult with their own physician. Click Terms of Use for more information.